Loving It Here for Twelve Years

Sarah sits smiling at the camera in front of a beige wall. She is sitting next to a yellow lab

I never knew how much Leader Dogs for the Blind would mean to me or how invested I would become when I began volunteering in August 2007. I started by coming in one day a week but I quickly realized how much I loved being here. I kept adding days to my schedule and I currently volunteer four days a week. I split my time between canine center receptionist and canine support assistant. I look forward to coming in each and every day because it puts a smile on my face. It really makes me feel good to help other people and be a service to the community.

The canine center receptionist role is extremely rewarding. I have always loved being around dogs and I enjoy administrative work so this was the perfect fit for me. I answer incoming calls and talk to some amazing people. I enjoy greeting all the visitors, puppy raisers, volunteers and employees when they come into the canine center. I have gotten to know a lot of people and I value all the friendships I have made over the years. My favorite part is interacting with others and how I feel when I have helped someone either in person or over the phone.

There are so many things I enjoy about this volunteer role, but one of my absolute favorite things is witnessing career changed dogs go to their new home. It is especially fun to see puppy raisers come in to pick up their dog after being career changed. The puppy raisers simply amaze me with how much work they put into raising their puppies. The dogs are so excited to be reunited with their raisers!

I am really impressed with the organization and how much time and training is required to prepare a dog to become a Leader Dog for a client. As a canine support assistant, I get to spend one-on-one time with the dogs in training. I love being able to sit with the dogs, give them love and interact with them. I feel that the dogs work hard and it brightens their day and makes them feel special to receive individual attention. It is also rewarding to be a part of these dogs’ lives knowing that they could potentially be guiding a person who is visually impaired or blind in the future.

Volunteering at LDB these past 12 years has been such an amazing experience. I am so grateful to be part of such a wonderful organization that provides their services free of charge. I love spending a large part of my week at LDB and knowing it is helping clients gain independence.

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